The Telegraph Tells The Grand Tour To End After Calling It “Rustbucket TV”


With the next episode of The Grand Tour open to fans to watch on Amazon Prime Video, the reviews are now flooding in for A Massive Hunt. While we gave them a, mostly, glowing review, and while we admitted there were some problems with the episode, we’re glad to see Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond, and James May embrace their Top Gear roots and move from boats back to cars again. Phew.

But other websites weren’t so positive. One website stood out above the rest however, calling the episode “rustbucket TV”. The Telegraph couldn’t have been more slating of The Grand Tour hosts as they travel across Madagascar in search of hidden pirate treasure, giving them only two out of five stars.

“Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May’s shtick is beginning to look as clapped-out as a minicab with too many miles on the clock,” the site says as it begins its review on the episode, and we partly agree. Shock horror, I know. But this episode reminded me hugely of Top Gear’s search for the source of the Nile. Don’t get me wrong, this was a brilliant Top Gear episode, and I think it worked very well in The Grand Tour’s format.

But I worry, where do they go from here? With the new special-only structure of the show’s seasons, what else is there to do to keep variety, especially when there aren’t tent episodes to break up these specials. I suppose this is a problem that we’ll encounter during the next episode, but I understand where The Telegraph is coming from here.

The review continues with an attack on the presenters because of their handsome income from the show. What this has to do with the episode, I have no idea, but they choose to bring it up anyway. Maybe someone needs a payrise? They did however recognise the beauty of the videography and the Madagascar backdrop, which we agree with entirely.

Once again however, the review falls back into negativity, accusing the show of causing a sense of deja vu with a repetitive storyline from previous episodes. Again, I agree like I mentioned earlier in this piece, but for me this improved the episode by sprinkling it with the feeling of nostaligia from some of my favourite episodes of the past. “However, the entire enterprise was haunted by an unshakeable feeling of déjà vu. The scenery has changed but the story is basically the same and its impact has withered with age,” The Telegraph wrote.

Calling for the episode to be 60 minutes over the total 90, The Telegraph explains it as being “repetitive”, and also insists that “the explosive blockbuster ending doesn’t quite work”. I don’t know about you, but I thought the Bentley Continental GT grappling its way through the loose sand was a brilliant bit of filming, despite it quite obviously being planned.

“The Grand Tour has become over-reliant on the trio’s chemistry and little else. It’s no longer entertaining enough to conceal this fatigued format’s ever more apparent flaws,” the review ends.

I want to stress that reviews are only opinions, and we should respect them like any other. I want to know which side of the fence you sit on. Do you agree with The Telegraph and believe that the trio has lost their touch, or are you thinking they still have some more time before they run out of ideas? Let us know in the comments, we’re really interested to find out.

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