Jeremy Clarkson Fears That He Hasn’t Got Long Left After 61st Birthday


Jeremy Clarkson has admitted that after his 61st birthday, The Grand Tour presenter has been worried about dying. 

He explains that after close friends and members of his family died at the same age, he fears that he hasn’t got long left. 

“Everyone I know dies at 61. All my friends did, my dad did, that’s when you go… If I make it to 62, I’ll be here forever,” Jeremy told Saga magazine.

“When dad died, I thought of him as an old man, but I don’t feel old. When I see myself on screen I think, ‘Who’s that?’ I always expect a 19-year-old to be looking back at me. But old people don’t look like we think they should,” he continued.

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Later in the interview, he joked that he won’t be “dancing to Vera Lynn”, and will instead be rocking out to White Riot by The Clash in his care home. 

Only months back, the ex-Top gear presenter was faced with catching COVID-19 and was very worried about what this could mean after a lifestyle of smoking and alcohol.

“I spent the first day Googling, ‘Can you drink?’ and I found one website that said you could, so I took a case of wine to the bedroom and some Bond films, and in the end, it was mild,” he said. 

Jeremy Clarkson suffered from COVID while looking after his Diddly Squat Farm for a new Amazon Prime Video series which will be coming June 11th. Here, he’ll explore the challenges of running a farm during the worst year for weather and the pandemic. Amazon explains it as the following:

Jeremy Clarkson is a journalist, a broadcaster, and a man who travels the world to slide sideways in supercars while shouting. He is not a farmer, which is unfortunate because he’s bought a 1,000-acre farm in the English countryside and decided to run it himself, despite knowing nothing whatsoever about farming. The series follows an intense, backbreaking and frequently hilarious year in the life of Britain’s most unlikely farmer and his team, as they contend with the worst farming weather in decades, disobedient animals, unresponsive crops, and an unexpected pandemic.

Helped only by his gang of agricultural associates, Clarkson quickly discovers that a modern farmer must be a conservationist, scientist, shepherd, shopkeeper, midwife, engineer, accountant and tractor driver, often at the same time. Despite the calamities that ensue, this is most definitely not “The Grand Tour goes farming.” Here on the farm the failures have real emotional consequences and Jeremy, completely out of his comfort zone, must lean on others as he strives to grow crops, rear sheep and pull off environmental projects that are close to his heart. And yes, you read that last bit correctly. This is Jeremy Clarkson as you’ve never seen him before.

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