Koenigsegg Makes Back Handed Comment About Bugatti's Speed Record
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Koenigsegg Makes Back-Handed Comment About Bugatti’s Speed Record

It’s no secret anymore that Bugatti has broken the speed record with a top speed of 304.77, but John Hennessey has already made a jab at the fact it was with a modified car, and in only one direction. You can read about that here.

Today, Koenigsegg has also had the time to ford their own response, and it’s about as back handed as Hennessey’s.

A spokesperson told TopGear.com the following:

“It’s a great achievement. If the homologated production version of the same car can drive faster than 284.55mph – or 277.9mph as average speed in two directions – then it will take the crown from the Agera RS as the fastest production car until now.”

Bugatti Chiron Top Speed record
– the Bugatti Chiron

I think their point was very obvious. Bugatti has not broken any records until they test the car in the exact same way as every other car that has gone before it. This means a two-way measurement, with an average speed extracted from it.

Koenigsegg also hint at the performance of their upcoming Jesko. Named after CEO Christian von Koenigsegg’s father, the Jesko uses a 5.0-litre twin-turbo V8 to produce 1,578bhp and 1,106lb ft og torque using E85 fuel. This, according to the Swedish company, should exceed the performance of the Chiron.

“We have said before and say now, a high-speed version of the Jesko should be capable of driving faster than 300mph,” the spokesperson told us.

SSC Tuatara
– the SSC Tuatara

“The same tools we used to estimate the Agera RS were used to come to this conclusion, and in the Agera RS we underestimated the speed a bit.”

Still to comments on the Chiron’s record is SSC, with their highly strung Tuatara. We”re reaching out to them to see if they have any comments on the viability of Bugatti’s run.

Written by Alex Harrington

Alex started racing at a young age so certainly knows his way around a car and a track. He can just about put a sentence together too, which helps.

He has a great interest in the latest models, but would throw all of his money at a rusty old French classic and a 300ZX.

Contact: [email protected]

Comments

    • by that logic a lot of other manufacturers have already broken 300mph. it’s a non-production car, making it only as good as a heavily modified drag racing car that can go way over 300mph. the said record is about the fastest Production car, a car that is available to customers. this one on the other hand uses street ILLEGAL tires, huge bodykit and more power, none of which is available in the production model. by your logic the car that actually broke the record was a modified ford GT back in march, also any other 3000hp drag car before that.

  1. Bugatti are part of VW/Audi, so any figure’s the claim must be taken in the same light as what they claim for their diesel engine emissions. (In other words BS)
    Enough said

  2. Ita a nice looking car . However styled straight out of the ferrari style house. Nice looking car but great engineering is what gets you the speed record. Not looks . Somehow this car just doesn’t look as refined a Koeniggsegg or a Bugatti. American cars are notoriously poor so we will see just how much engineering and dynamics of understanding science actually has gone into producing a great supercar. For me Koeniggsedd are way ahead of the field in terms of engineering dynamics . I just wish the UK would get in on this and start producing thier own hypercar in the form of a Aston Marton hypercar that can match that of Bugatti and koeniggsegg . After a we do hold the world landscapes record amd are about to top the 1000 mph record . So let’s see a British supercar in on the action too

  3. Take the jesko to the test track and let it do exactly the same run and see what it does. Then compare the two cars

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