Fast And Furious Game Trailer And Review Released And… It’s A Write-Off

The Fast and The Furious has had quite a run, hasn’t it? Countless films, now a spin-off series in the form of Hobbs and Shaw, and now while we’re waiting for the ninth installment of the franchise, they’ve released a game to tide us over.

And that’s nice and all. But… is this it?

For one, holy Playstation 2 graphics! Developed by Slightly Mad Studios and Tigon Studios, this game that’s available now on PC, Xbox One, and PS4 looks, well, awful. The graphics are shoddy, the physics look janky, and I’m not holding out for an amazing story. But while I’m on it, I’ll give your the quick rundown. There’s a criminal gang, you discover it and you unravel it. Shocker.

Tyrese Gibson, Vin Diesel and Michelle Rodriguez make their various appearances and the two leads come in the form of Sonequa Martin-Green and Asia Kate-Dillon who are both reportedly very good in their roles. Despite this, it has had seriously bad reviews from everyone.

I mean… really?

EuroGamer.net said: “A decent Fast & Furious tale is undone by a disaster of a game.”

Polygon says: “it seems as if the game was sent out into the world to die a quick, hopefully silent death, never to be talked about again.”

IGN says: “Fast & Furious Crossroads is short, shallow, and surprisingly simple, and it’s nothing less than a crashing disappointment in virtually every department.”

This is my favourite quote from the Polygon piece, which just highlights how much (or little) effort was put into this trainwreck of a game:

“There is a single camera angle, and it does a poor job of showing what’s going on.”

It’s safe to say, despite us not playing it BECAUSE IT’S $59.99, that this is a game we will never be interested in playing. Okay, maybe if it really drops in price and we think we can get some laughs from it… But seriously? I expected better. Or did I?

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