The Aston Martin Cygnet was a rebadged Toyota IQ, made specifically to make their lineup of cars, on average, more polar bear friendly. Its name was short-lived with the British marque not managing to sell more than 150 units in two years. But thanks to the Cygnet, Aston was able to carry on producing the V8 and V12 monsters we love.

Five years later, and the Cygnet has again managed to squeeze its way back into our press release inbox. But there’s something very different about this specimen. For one, it houses the same 4.7-litre naturally aspirated V8 engine from the Vantage S under its bonnet. If that doesn’t spark an interest, I don’t know what will.

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The talented ladies and gents at Aston Martin’s Q department have been able to wedge 430bhp between the front bumper and the firewall – the same space which used to lay waste to the original 1.0-litre 3-cylinder engine made by Toyota. Then, they placed a ‘very short torque tube’ between the engine and the rear wheels. This, coupled with the extremely low kerb weight of the Cygnet, produces a power to weight ratio of 313bhp/tonne. Naturally, it’s quite a handful.

This doesn’t scare of Aston, though. They’ve tested it and tell us that it reaches 60mph in just 4.2sec, and has a frightening top speed of 170mph. What a day in the office that must have been.

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A fast car has to be able to slow down however, so under the carbon-composite wheel arches sit the original wheels from the Vantage S, as well as 6-piston brakes, subframes, and suspension. And at the rear, that promising exhaust is completely bespoke to just this vehicle.

Aston Martin doesn’t finish a job halfway however. The interior has been taken from the Vantage S, as well, and an FIA-approved rollcage and seats have also been fitted. Just in case the new owner wants to take this to any FIA-approved motorsport of course.

This one-off Cygnet just goes to show how miraculous and clever Aston Martin’s Q department can be. If only other manufacturers had the resources and ability to pull off something similar.