After 20 months of drama and anticipation, The Grand Tour finally premiered yesterday to the US, UK, Japan, Germany and the millions of newly minted pirates of the digital world.

Over an hour of solid automotive heaven that showcased the Holy Trinity of hypercars in the Porsche 918, Ferrari LaFerrari Ferrari, and McLaren P1 along with using the BMW M2 to showcase the new track where the new racing driver from America was revealed. Critics will be critics, and The Grand Tour is the latest show which have received their services and the verdict is . . . . . . . . . the British critics love it.

Across the board, the critics in the boy’s home country have raved about the show’s premiere, giving it comments left and right, and far too often reminding the BBC how much better it is then their most recent attempt at Top Gear.

Sam Wollaston, of The Guardian, was enamored with the opening sequence of the show saying “It is, undeniably, a brilliant beautiful spectacle.” Mr. Wollaston wasn’t the only person with great things to say about the show, no there were plenty more.

The Daily Telegraph’s Ed Power said of the show “The real question was whether Clarkson, May and Hammond could reprise the chemistry that made ‘Top Gear’ an international sensation” to which he answered his own question with an enthusiastic “yes.”

In yet another glowing review, The Sun’s Dan Wootton said “A £160 million investment has made ‘The Grand Tour’ one of the most exhilarating TV series ever — and I don’t even like cars,” also commenting that “If you thought the trademark banter that made ‘Top Gear’ such a phenomenon was gone for good, there was no need to worry.”

the-grand-tour-opening-sequence-mustangs

It looks as those the trio has done right by not only their fans but also their critics. Many remarked about getting misty-eyed during the opening sequence in which the boys meet up together in the California desert, driving side by side in various renditions of the Ford Mustang, and aside from a few small quirks, the show has yet to receive anything representing a poor review, most likely to the chagrin of the BBC.

Perhaps Dan Wootton said it best, saying “the one thing that really matters is Clarkson being reunited with his two mates on screen.”

We couldn’t have summed it up any better Dan.

5 Responses

  1. mo

    The intro sequence was really what made it great. The tent sequences and terrible jokes by “The American” were dragging ass and groan worthy though. I really hope that isn’t a recurring thing.

  2. Elle

    As a long time fan of Top Gear did I think The Grand Tour was as good as the BEST of Top Gear – no. Don’t get me wrong, I thought it was good but there were flaws. First, the banter just seemed a little strained, maybe forced, at times. This was most likely because Clarkson et al were not in their nice comfortable BBC blanky but out in the wild. Second, Clarkson’s non-PC jibe at Gypsies was funny but came across as rather too scripted than off-the-cuff. Trying a little too hard? The opening sequence was brilliant, absolutely brilliant and I loved “Burning Van” – that was inspired. But the audience waiting outside? Just a tad too ott but this was America.

    Hopefully it will settle down in future episodes but I’m not overly optimistic because they have already been shot so the boys aren’t able to benefit from audience reaction. It took TG a few series to get really good for this reason.

    Will I be watching the next episode. Hell yes, can’t wait.

  3. Josh

    World-class cinematography in 4k resolution combined with one of the most brilliant pieces of script writing I have ever witnessed makes the first 5 minutes of The Grand Tour an absolute masterpiece in itself. Without saying a word, Jeremy Clarkson evokes emotion and tells a story that words cannot justly convey. I am not a fan of Top Gear or of The Grand Tour. I am a fan of Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May.

%d bloggers like this: