Technology has come a long way since Jeremy Clarkson filmed a segment where he compared a real race track time versus a track time he got on Gran Turismo.

As some of you may remember, Jezza selected the Laguna Seca course on Grand Turismo and proceeded to log in his track time via a Honda NSX with a 1:41.

Now that it’s been almost a decade since this segment has been filmed and sim-racing technology has improved by leaps and bounds where any racing enthusiast worth a salt would have a racing wheel, pedals and possible a shifter in his racing rig, the question has to be:

Could Jeremy Clarkson beat his 1:41 time in a simulator?

The world of sim racing has been taking off in the past few years with technology of video games, monitors and steering wheel equipment really taking off to the point where F1 Racing drivers like Lewis Hamilton are taking a crack at online legends like Ali A.

There are a bunch of simulators out there that you can put together that range from $100 to $35,000.

The feeling is that Jezza would definitely put a time better than the 1:41 he got using a playstation controller, so the challenge of trying to match that time in real life just got a little bit harder.

Now, what kind of setup should he use. Well, with Amazon’s deep pockets, scroll down to the bottom, but since we know some of you may wonder, here’s a list of setups we found including the $35k dream machine.

Please note Wheels, Pedals and Shifters can range from $350 to $1000 and the cockpits range from price from DIY to the cost of a real car.

$100 Budget

$1000 Give it a Shot Budget

$2000 Serious Racer Budget

Dream Machine Status

One Response

  1. Wesley Zhao

    Please use a direct drive wheel if you guys do a racing sim in grand tour. that 35k setup is barley worth it. The wheel is fanatec which is good but is no where 35k

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